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OHRC working to address anti-Indigenous racism in lacrosse

December 1, 2020

In recognition of the importance of lacrosse to Indigenous cultures and in the face of troubling reports of racial slurs and mistreatment in games involving Six Nations lacrosse players, the Ontario Human Rights Commission will meet with Six Nations of the Grand River First Nation, the Ontario Lacrosse Association and the Canadian Lacrosse Association to engage in discussions about how to address concerns of systemic racism against Indigenous lacrosse players. [News release also available in Mohawk]

OHRC statement for National Housing Day November 22: Accessible housing makes social, economic sense

November 22, 2020

On National Housing Day, the OHRC calls on the Province to amend Ontario’s Building Code Regulation to require all units in new construction or major renovation of multi-unit residences to fully meet universal accessibility standards. The OHRC also calls on municipalities to prioritize universal design construction, consistent with their obligations under the Code. Government and housing providers must work together to make sure that new developments are fully inclusive, because Ontarians deserve no less.

Check out the new HR101

November 9, 2020

Check out the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s newest version of Human Rights 101. This revised eLearning program offers a fresh new look, expanded discussions on types of discrimination and the latest directions in human rights, along with added scenarios and knowledge checks. 

Human rights in Ontario

Ontario's Human Rights Code is a provincial law that gives everybody equal rights and opportunities without discrimination in specific social areas such as jobs, housing, services, facilities, and contracts or agreements.

The Code's goal is to prevent discrimination and harassment because of race, sex, disability, and age, to name a few of the 17 grounds. All other Ontario laws must agree with the Code.

Not all unfair treatment and harassment is covered by the Code. The treatment or harassment must be based on at least one Code ground and take place within a social area to be protected.

The Ontario Human Rights System is made up of three separate agencies:

  1. The Ontario Human Rights Commission (that’s us) works to promote, protect and advance human rights through research, education, targeted legal action and policy development.
  2. The Human Rights Legal Support Centre gives legal help to people who have experienced discrimination under the Code.
  3. The Human Rights Tribunal is where human rights applications are filed and decided.

To learn more, complete our Human Rights 101 eLearning.